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Maharaj Charan Singh Ji (Translation)

These spiritual discourses are translations into English from satsangs given in Punjabi by Maharaj Charan Singh. Through a spiritual discourse, we associate with those great souls who are familiar with the world of the spirit and who can share their knowledge with us. The Indian term for a spiritual discourse, satsang, means ‘association with the truth’. The spiritual masters whose teachings are presented here always urge us to travel the inner spiritual path ourselves in order to experience the truth of their teachings.

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Maharaj Charan Singh was a lawyer by profession before being appointed spiritual Master of Radha Soami Satsang Beas in 1951. He said that his way of speaking reflected his lawyer’s training. When giving a discourse, he spoke quietly and slowly at the beginning. Without notes, he quoted extensively from the Sikh scriptures and from the writings of many Indian saints. His concern was always to remind his audience that all saints and God-realized souls teach the same truth. As the discourse progressed, his speed increased, and he built around his core text an unassailable and overwhelming case for the inner way to God. The discourse could last anything from one to two hours. He followed the traditional style of India, where a text is sung verse by verse and the speaker explains the text after each verse is sung.

Maharaj Ji always began his discourses saying that the essential teachings of every saint are the same. These five discourses or satsangs reflect that truth. The texts on which they are based are drawn from the writings of Soami Ji of Agra, Uttar Pradesh, who lived in the nineteenth century, and Guru Amardas of Punjab, who lived in the sixteenth century. Maharaj Ji also illustrated his teachings with dozens of quotations from a wide range of saints, so the universality of his message became very clear.

  • Among Your Companions, None Is Your Friend
      
    In this discourse based on a poem by Soami Ji, Maharaj Ji reminds us that only the spiritual masters are our true friends. Everyone else looks at us for what they can gain from us. Our possessions, our wealth, our name and fame, will leave us eventually. Attend to your spiritual work while you still have time. Do your meditation and let go of illusion so that you may meet the Lord within.
  • Come, My Friend, To Your True Home
      
    Soami Ji reminds us that this world is not our true home. He invites us to travel with him to the inner realms by stilling our mind and merging our soul in Naam, the inner spiritual melody always reverberating within. The Master has our best interests at heart and is telling us this out of his love and compassion. Come inside to the eye centre and transcend duality. Rise to the highest realm of Radha Soami, where your heart will be drenched in bliss.
  • He is the True Creator, the Only Giver
      
    In this hymn, Guru Amardas is telling us that the Lord is the eternal One, and is the creator of all. He has only one command – to unite with the true Word. Only by merging in the true Word can we find salvation and experience the oneness of the creation. He says we should reject all outward observances, penances, learning, and austerities, as they will never bring peace. He says: “Steep your heart in the color of devotion and serve the Guru. The Lord himself creates all beings. He himself bestows honour and brings union through his divine Will… In every age He is the Truth, the one benevolent Lord. When one’s destiny is perfect, he is realized through the Guru’s Word.”
  • My Friend, Why Stay Caught In This World
      
    In this poem, Soami Ji reveals why we experience so much stress in our lives. We are drowned in delusion and are caught in desire and attachment, greed, anger and lust. We forget about death that is just around the corner. Take refuge in the Master, he says. Apart from the Master no one has our interests at heart. What can I say to persuade you? Please heed this warning, Soami Ji says, but no one ever heeds the words of the saints.
  • O Friend, Observe the Law of This Age
      
    In this hymn, Guru Amardas emphasizes that in this era, enlightenment can only be attained through service to a true Guru. Only the Naam, the Lord’s Name or Shabd, will accompany us. So please do your meditation and repeat the repeat the Lord’s Name, and contemplate on it with your mind. With the grace of the Guru, remove all impurities. He says that the entire creation is stained by impurities and in the thrall of ego and hypocrisy. Only those devoted to the Lord will enjoy the bliss of realization. No external methods or rituals can bring liberation. They just add to the ego. But even while living as householders, those devoted to the Lord and Naam are absorbed in Truth.
  • With the exception of the first discourse, Karo Ri Koi Satsang Aaj Banaye, which is an actual recording of Maharaj Ji speaking in Hindi, all of the other discourses are translations into Hindi from satsangs given in Punjabi by Maharaj Charan Singh.

    Through a spiritual discourse, we associate with those great souls who are familiar with the world of the spirit and who can share their knowledge with us. The Indian term for a spiritual discourse, satsang, means ‘association with the truth’. The spiritual masters whose teachings are presented here always urge us to travel the inner spiritual path ourselves in order to experience the truth of their teachings.

    More

    Maharaj Charan Singh was a lawyer by profession before being appointed spiritual Master of Radha Soami Satsang Beas in 1951. He said that his way of speaking reflected his lawyer’s training. When giving a discourse, he spoke quietly and slowly at the beginning. Without notes, he quoted extensively from the Sikh scriptures and from the writings of many Indian saints. His concern was always to remind his audience that all saints and God-realized souls teach the same truth. As the discourse progressed, his speed increased, and he built around his core text an unassailable and overwhelming case for the inner way to God. The discourse could last anything from one to two hours. He followed the traditional style of India, where a text is sung verse by verse and the speaker explains the text after each verse is sung.

    Maharaj Ji always began his discourses saying that the essential teachings of every saint are the same. The texts on which they are based are drawn from the writings of Soami Ji of Agra, Uttar Pradesh, who lived in the nineteenth century, and Guru Amardas of Punjab, who lived in the sixteenth century. Maharaj Ji also illustrated his teachings with dozens of quotations from a wide range of saints, so the universality of his message became very clear.


    Translation

    Through a spiritual discourse, we associate with those great souls who are familiar with the world of the spirit and who can share their knowledge with us. The Indian term for a spiritual discourse, satsang, means ‘association with the truth’. The spiritual masters whose teachings are presented here always urge us to travel the inner spiritual path ourselves in order to experience the truth of their teachings.

    Maharaj Jagat Singh was the Master at Dera Baba Jaimal Singh in Beas, Punjab, between 1948 and 1951. Sardar Bahadur Ji, as he was respectfully called, was initiated by Maharaj Sawan Singh. Typically, Sardar Bahadur Ji closely follows the couplets of the text he was commenting on; at times he even anticipates the next couplet of the text, subtly introducing and discussing the idea of what the pathi would chant next. The satsangs are peppered with rhetorical questions. In these satsangs we hear an echo of the way he spoke and they reveal a facet of the Master: sparing, ardent, forceful, and delightfully colloquial.

    Translation

    Through a spiritual discourse, we associate with those great souls who are familiar with the world of the spirit and who can share their knowledge with us. The Indian term for a spiritual discourse, satsang, means ‘association with the truth’. The spiritual masters whose teachings are presented here always urge us to travel the inner spiritual path ourselves in order to experience the truth of their teachings.

    Maharaj Sawan Singh was known by his disciples as the Great Master. A military engineer and Persian scholar, he was a disciple of Baba Jaimal Singh who founded the Radha Soami Satsang. After the passing of Baba Jaimal Singh, Maharaj Sawan Singh became the master at Dera Baba Jaimal Singh from 1903 to 1948. The Great Master was known for his succinct and powerful way of speaking, not just during his discourses, but in everyday life also. The satsangs of the Master were laced with wit and humour. He livened up the satsang with amusing tales, all with a spiritual message.

    Translation

    These twenty satsangs have been edited from longer satsangs to approximately 30 minutes in length to accommodate the length of satsang in many countries around the world.

    Through a spiritual discourse, we associate with those great souls who are familiar with the world of the spirit and who can share their knowledge with us. The Indian term for a spiritual discourse, satsang, means ‘association with the truth’. The spiritual masters whose teachings are presented here always urge us to travel the inner spiritual path ourselves in order to experience the truth of their teachings.

    Maharaj Sawan Singh was known by his disciples as the Great Master. A military engineer and Persian scholar, he was a disciple of Baba Jaimal Singh who founded the Radha Soami Satsang. After the passing of Baba Jaimal Singh, Maharaj Sawan Singh became the master at Dera Baba Jaimal Singh from 1903 to 1948. The Great Master was known for his succinct and powerful way of speaking, not just during his discourses, but in everyday life also. The satsangs of the Master were laced with wit and humour. He livened up the satsang with amusing tales, all with a spiritual message.

    Abridged Translation

    These spiritual discourses are original recordings of satsangs given in Punjabi by Maharaj Charan Singh. Through a spiritual discourse, we associate with those great souls who are familiar with the world of the spirit and who can share their knowledge with us. The Indian term for a spiritual discourse, satsang, means ‘association with the truth’. The spiritual masters whose teachings are presented here always urge us to travel the inner spiritual path ourselves in order to experience the truth of their teachings.

    More

    Maharaj Charan Singh was a lawyer by profession before being appointed spiritual Master of Radha Soami Satsang Beas in 1951. He said that his way of speaking reflected his lawyer’s training. When giving a discourse, he spoke quietly and slowly at the beginning. Without notes, he quoted extensively from the Sikh scriptures and from the writings of many Indian saints. His concern was always to remind his audience that all saints and God-realized souls teach the same truth. As the discourse progressed, his speed increased, and he built around his core text an unassailable and overwhelming case for the inner way to God. The discourse could last anything from one to two hours. He followed the traditional style of India, where a text is sung verse by verse and the speaker explains the text after each verse is sung.

    Maharaj Ji always began his discourses saying that the essential teachings of every saint are the same. The texts on which they are based are drawn from the writings of Soami Ji of Agra, Uttar Pradesh, who lived in the nineteenth century, and Guru Amardas of Punjab, who lived in the sixteenth century. Maharaj Ji also illustrated his teachings with dozens of quotations from a wide range of saints, so the universality of his message became very clear.

    Maharaj Charan Singh Ji

    These spiritual discourses are translations into Spanish from satsangs given in Punjabi by Maharaj Charan Singh. Through a spiritual discourse, we associate with those great souls who are familiar with the world of the spirit and who can share their knowledge with us. The Indian term for a spiritual discourse, satsang, means ‘association with the truth’. The spiritual masters whose teachings are presented here always urge us to travel the inner spiritual path ourselves in order to experience the truth of their teachings.

    More

    Maharaj Charan Singh was a lawyer by profession before being appointed spiritual Master of Radha Soami Satsang Beas in 1951. He said that his way of speaking reflected his lawyer’s training. When giving a discourse, he spoke quietly and slowly at the beginning. Without notes, he quoted extensively from the Sikh scriptures and from the writings of many Indian saints. His concern was always to remind his audience that all saints and God-realized souls teach the same truth. As the discourse progressed, his speed increased, and he built around his core text an unassailable and overwhelming case for the inner way to God. The discourse could last anything from one to two hours. He followed the traditional style of India, where a text is sung verse by verse and the speaker explains the text after each verse is sung.

    Maharaj Ji always began his discourses saying that the essential teachings of every saint are the same. The texts on which they are based are drawn from the writings of Soami Ji of Agra, Uttar Pradesh, who lived in the nineteenth century, and Guru Amardas of Punjab, who lived in the sixteenth century. Maharaj Ji also illustrated his teachings with dozens of quotations from a wide range of saints, so the universality of his message became very clear.

    Maharaj Charan Singh Ji (Translation)